SEB Newsletter Article

Like most scientists, I am the member of several scientific societies. These societies run peer-reviewed journals and organize conferences, meaning they provide the mechanism by which science is shared and distributed. Some also have more informal newsletters that contain information of interest to members of the society. As the winner of the Edmund H. Fulling Award…

Scenario Planning

As part of my dissertation I am analyzing different strategies for reducing the environmental impacts of aguaje harvest. This type of analysis is  called “Scenario Planning.”  It is often used in city or regional planning to evaluate different development options. Usually sets of options are set up as packages and the relative costs, impacts, and…

Peek Behind the Petals Lightening Talk

As you may know, I am a Botany in Action Fellow through the Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Phipps supports 6 doctoral students through their Fellowship and every September the Fellows come to Pittsburgh to participate in the Phipps sponsored Science Engagement Week. During this week, Phipps offers a Peek Behind the Petals Event to Conservatory…

Phipps Science Engagement Week 2016

I’m back at Phipps for a much anticipated Science Engagement Week. As part of the Botany in Action Fellowship I am lucky enough to participate in this outreach event and workshop series. We started this morning with the “Interview a Scientist” event with K12 students. Every BIA fellow is interviewed by 3 groups of students…

Society for Economic Botany – 2016 Conference

This past week I attended the annual conference for the Society for Economic Botany (SEB), where I am a student member. I presented some of my dissertation work and won the Edmund H. Fulling Award for best student talk! The meeting was held at the Pine Mountain Settlement School in Kentucky. This location was absolutely beautiful!…

A little bit at a time

It’s practically April and a large part of this semester has been entering data, followed by analyzing and writing up my findings (mostly entering data). This part of science is a slow and iterative process, and sometimes it feels like someone has given me the torn up bits to a book that I’m trying to…